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Retrospective 2018

Former WN Police Chief accused of “oppressive and tyrannical behaviour”

just before stepping down

by Suzanne Gammon
Tribune

It was the second time a WN Police Chief left in a shroud of controversy after being the subject of an investigation, and while we may never know the circumstances of former Chief Richard Lahaie’s “retirement” and legal agreement with the municipality years ago, despite the Tribune’s repeated requests under Freedom of Information, some bits of information are now surfacing about last summer’s resignation by former Chief Chuck Seguin. It seems at the time of the resignation, an investigation into Seguin’s conduct had pegged him as abusive toward his staff, which may have prompted him to leave willingly before possibly facing harsher consequences.

Seguin announced his resignation June 12, citing “a new and exciting opportunity” outside of policing as the reason he was leaving his position effective July 3, 2018. He later took a job with the Nipissing Parry-Sound Student Transportation Services, a consortium which manages transportation for students of all four area school boards. His salary as Chief of Police for West Nipissing for 2017, the last time it was disclosed under the Ontario Ministry of Finance’s annual Public Sector Salary Disclosure or “Sunshine list”, was $178,093 plus $6,664 in benefits, up from $151,516 in 2016.


​The move was surprising as it came 15 months before the end of his contract, after he said he had agreed to stay on as Chief to help smooth the transition, either to a new chief or to a new service altogether, as the town had resolved to move to the OPP. Seguin had officially retired on September 30, 2017, and thus begun to receive his pension, but then entered into a new temporary contract to stay on until December 31, 2019. At the time, he stated he did not want to abandon the service while in transition, as it needed stability. He also stated that his severance remained intact in the event of an OPP changeover, saying “should Council opt for the OPP and I am not offered a position or do not accept a position and find myself with no further employment, the terms regarding severance remain the same as they always were in my previous contract agreements,” though he did not specify what that severance would be.


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